Articles

posted on: 30-Aug-2013

In the past three articles about women in architecture, we have spoken to young graduates in the verge of their architectural careers; to mothers balancing family and professional lives; and to wives building a practice alongside their husbands. In this last article in a series of four, 5 women speak candidly about their journey through […]

posted on: 30-Aug-2013

This is the third of our series of four articles about women in architecture in Sarawak; in this issue we focus on women who are in practice with their husbands. Much has been made about the recent success of architect-couples; Billie Tsien and Tod Williams; Scofidio and Dillier; and Koning and Eizenberg as seen in […]

posted on: 27-Aug-2013

In our last issue, we interviewed several women architects and discussed the steps they are taking in their careers leading up to the setting up of their own practice. Spousal support and personal commitment appear to be the key elements for this career path to succeed. In this issue, we look at the challenges facing […]

posted on: 27-Aug-2013

In this series of articles, INTERSECTION will interview women architects in Sarawak – from the graduate to the salaried architect, the free-lancer to the director – to unearth the role women architects play in the local architectural scene. Worldwide, there is a disparity in the number of women who graduate from architecture school and the […]

posted on: 07-Aug-2013

The Wooden Fort
On the 17th of July 2013, I was one of 18 participants which comprised facilitating teachers and local school children attending a site visit to Fort Alice, Sri Aman. The visit was conducted by Mike Boon and coordinated by Mr. Goh Kaw Sze. The aim of the visit was to give the school children a chance to see the structural core of the Fort before it was to be taken down completely.

Malay “Tomb”
The day’s events started with the mandatory safety briefing. We were each handed a hard hat and instructed to always keep in the designated zone clearly marked by security tapes. Then, we were brought to a freshly dug-up site at the front of the Fort and introduced to En. Mohd. Sherman, Curator from Jabatan Muzium Sarawak (JMS).

Dismantling Process
We were then given a brief induction into the Fort’s dismantling process by Conservators-on-site Mr. Eng Chee Kuan and Mr. Ooi Zhen Ning (both young graduates from Penang). They explained that during dismantling, every detail has to be recorded through sketches, drawings, photographs and videos so the Fort can be reassembled in the same manner.

Timber
Having learnt how the Fort is held up, we moved on to the shed at the rear of the building to discover what she was made of, which was primarily timber. Over the years, normal hardwood (now suffering from wet rot and termites) had been added on during maintenance works and the tour turned interactive as Local Carpenter Mr. Ting Nik Sing and Ar. Mike Boon tasked us with a series of tests utilizing our five senses to differentiate between belian and other hardwoods.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Upcoming Events

Advertisement

Print DML Nippon

Gala Dinner 2017

1500560435gd_341 1500559851gd_058 1500560088gd_141 1500560115gd_155 1500560812gd_657 1500560772gd_668 1500559652gd_022 1500559797gd_046 1500560173gd_208 1500559861gd_061